Sunday, June 22, 2014

Nirma University M.Tech. in CSE INS Syllabus



Appendix E
Page 1 of 10
Nirma University
Institute of Technology
Computer Science and Engineering Department
M.Tech. in CSE (INS)
Detailed Syllabus
Semester – I
3CS1101 High Speed Networks [3 - 1 4]
Learning Outcome
• Students would be able to describe and interpret the basics of high speed networking technologies.
• Students will be able to apply the concept learnt in this course to optimize and troubleshoot highspeed
network.
• Students will be able to demonstrate the knowledge of network planning and optimization.
• Students will be able to design and configure network that have outcome characteristics needed to
support a specified set of applications.
Syllabus
Introduction to Computer Networks, Networking Principles, Constant Bit Rate, Variable Bit Rate Network
Services, Network Elements, Multiplexing, Switching, Error Control, Flow Control
Introduction to High Speed Networks, Analysis of Network traffic using deterministic and stochastic Models,
Simulation tools, Tele-traffic engineering, Queuing Models
High Speed TCP Variants, Congestion Control in TCP/IP, ATM
High Speed LAN, Gigabit Ethernet, Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB)
Protocols for QoS Support: IntServ, DiffServ, RSVP, MPLS
Optical Fiber Transmission, TCP/IP Performance over Optical Networks, Fiber Distributed Data Interface,
Switched Multi-Megabit Dual Service(SMDS)
Applications demanding high speed communication, Multimedia IP broadcasting, Error resilience in
Multimedia Transmission, Satellite Broadcasting
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
References
1. High-speed networks and Internets – Performance and quality of service by William Stallings
2. High Performance TCP/IP Networking: Concepts, issues and solutions: By Mahoob Hassan Raj and
Jain
3. High-speed networks: TCP/IP and ATM design principles by William Stallings
4. High speed networks by Marc Boisseau, Michel Demange, Jean-Marie Munier
5. Multimedia Communications: Applications, Networks, Protocols and Standards, Fred Halsall,
Addison –Wesley
3SP1103 Communication Skills for Engineers [- 1 - -]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to develop effective communication skills (spoken and written).
• They will be more aware of the dynamics behind effective communication
• Develop effective recruitment skills.
Appendix E
Page 2 of 10
• Conduct effective business correspondence.
• Students will be able to make professional presentations.
• Student will be able to shrug off the fear of public speaking to some extent.
Syllabus
Communication Skills: Communication cycle, types and flows of Communication, barriers to communication
Non-verbal Communication and Cross-cultural communication
Listening Skills: Types of listening, Barriers to effective listening, tips to improve listening skills
Business Communication: Various types of Letters and format, agenda and minutes of meeting, types of
memo and Resume and job application, Email etiquettes
Speaking Skills: Group Discussion, Personal Interview, Seminar Presentation
Writing Abstract, Research paper and Dissertation, Summarizing technical material , References and styling
Writing Business Proposal
Report Writing
References
1. Basic Communication Skills for Technology – Andrea J Rutherford (Person)
2. Technical Writing Process and Product – Shron J. Gerson (Person)
3. Business Communication, Lesiker and Petit: MCGraw Hill Publications
4. Business Correspondence and Report Writing – R.C. Sharma, Krishna Mohan (Tata McGraw)
3CS2102 Cryptography and Cryptanalysis [3 – 1 4]
Learning Outcomes
• Students will understand the concepts related to the basics of Network Security like Cryptography
• Students will be able to understand the mechanisms to be employed while trying to satisfy any of the
Security Service
Syllabus
Overview: Services, Mechanisms, Attacks, OSI Security Architecture, Model for Network Security
Classical Encryption Techniques: Symmetric Cipher Model, Substitution Techniques, Transposition
Techniques, Steganography
Block Ciphers and the Data Encryption Standard
Confidentiality using Symmetric Encryption
Public Key Cryptography and RSA
Key Management; Other Public Key cryptosystems
MAC and Hash Functions
Digital Signatures
IPSec: Architecture of IPSec, Encapsulating Security Payload, Authentication Header
Monoalphabetic unilateral substitution systems using standard cipher alphabets
Monoalphabetic unilateral substitution systems using mixed cipher alphabets
Monoalphabetic multilateral substitution systems: Generation, Recovery and Solutions of using Mixed Cipher
Alphabets
Polygraphic Substitution Systems: Characteristics and Identification of polygraphic substitution
Frequency distribution of English digraphs, trigraphs, tetragraphs, word and pattern tables, utility tables
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
Appendix E
Page 3 of 10
References
1. Cryptography and Network Security Principles and Practices by William Stallings
2. Basic Cryptanalysis Field Manual
3CS2103 Web Security [2 – 2 4]
Learning Outcomes
• Students will be able to understand the need of Security in our day to day communications.
• Obvious vulnerabilities in the network and computer system will be understood by the students.
• Students will be motivated to identify the loop holes in the technologies
Syllabus
Internet Security
Working of Internet: Working of TCP/IP, Working of World Wide Web
Working of Hackers: Invading PCs, Script Kiddies, Working of Personal Hacker Protection
Working of Spyware and Antispyware: Introduction to Spywares, Detection Escapism, Invading Privacy,
Hijacking home page and search pages, working of dialers, working of keyloggers and rootkits, following
spyware money trail, working of anti-spyware
Websites and privacy: Working of Cookies, Web bugs, Websites, Websites building personal profiles
Dangers of Internet Search: Working of Google, Individual Know-how
Phishing Attacks: Working of Phishing, following phishing money trail, protection against phishing attacks
Zombies and Trojan Horses: Working of Zombies and Bot Networks, Working of Trojan Horses, Zombie
Money Trail, Working of Zombie and Trojan Protection
Security Dangers in Browsers: Hackers exploit Networks, Protection against browser based attacks
Worms and viruses: Working of viruses and worms, antivirus software
Wi-Fi security dangers and protections: Working of Wi-Fi, Invading Wi-Fi Networks, hotspots, Evil Twin
Hacks and Protections
Bluetooth Security Dangers: Working of Bluetooth and hacking
Working of Spam: Dangers of spam, Hiding identity and identification, Working of Anti-spam software
Denial of Service Attacks and Protection
Introduction to Virtual Private Networks
Introduction to Web Blocking and Parental Controls
Working of Personal Firewalls and Proxies
Personal Privacy and Security
Working of Identity Thefts
Credit Card Security
Dangers of Data Mining
Dangers of Workplace Surveillance system
Hacking cell phones
Working of Biometrics
Working of Location Tracking
DNA Matching
Working of Airport Scanners and Screening Systems
Working of Wiretapping and Lie Detectors
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
Appendix E
Page 4 of 10
References
1. How Personal and Internet Security Work by Preston Galla, Que Publications
2. Computer Security Concepts, Issues and Implementation by Alfred Basta and Wolf Halton, Cengage
Learning
3CS2104 Mathematical Foundation for Network Security [3 1 - 4]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to understand the basic Mathematics related research in Networks.
• Students will be motivated to use the Mathematics related to Network in their Projects and Seminars
• Students will be able to apply these concepts in various Computer Science related applications
Syllabus
Linear Programming: Introduction, Formulation of LPP – Graphical Solution of LPP – Solution of LPP by
simplex method – Mixed Constraints, Dual of Linear programming problem application of linear
programming.
Finite fields: Groups, Rings and Fields, Modular Arithmetic, Euclidean Algorithm, Galois Field, Order of a
group, Multiplicative group, Order of an Element in the group, Order of an element in multiplicative group,
Generators, cyclic group, finding inverses, extended Euclidean Algorithm, Applications in RSA, Quadratic
Residue and its applications
Introduction to Number Theory: Prime Numbers, Fermat’s and Euler’s Theorem, Testing for Primality,
Chinese Remainder Problem
Number Theory Problems: Integer Fraction Problem, RSA Problem, Quadratic Residuosity Problem,
Computing Square Roots in Zn, Discrete Logarithm Problem, Diffie-Hellman Problem, Composite Moduli,
Computing Individual bits, Subset sum problem, Factoring Polynomials over finite fields
Prime Number Issues: Probabilistic Primality Tests, Primality Tests, Irreducible polynomials over ZP,
Generators and elements of higher order
Random Numbers: Random and Pseudo Random Bit Generation, Statistical Tests, Cryptographically Secure
pseudorandom number generation
Short path problems: Introduction to Shortest path problems, Method of finding the shortest path,
Processing/balancing & Time Scheduling.
Graph Theory: Graph isomorphism, sub graphs, paths, reachability and connectedness, cycles, matrix
representation of graphs, trees, labeled trees, tree searching, undirected trees, spanning trees of connected
relations, minimal spanning trees, Vertex Cover Problem, Graph Coloring Problems, Min-cut Max-flow
problems, Applications of Graph Theory in Network and Security
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
References
1. Kantiswarup and Manmohan Gupta – Operations Research, Publishers: S.Chand & Sons, New
Delhi
2. Cryptography and Network Security by William Stallings, PHI
3. S.D. Sharma – Operations Research, Publishers: Kedarnath Ramnath & Co. Meerut
4. H.A. Tana – Operations Research, Publishers: Prentice Hall, New Delhi
5. Discrete Mathematical Structures with Applications to Computer Science by Tremblay J.P.,
Manohar R., Tata McGraw-Hill.
6. ‘Graph Theory with applications to Engineering and Computer Science’ By Narsingh Deo
7. E-book on Handbook of Applied Cryptography by Alfred J Menezes, Paul C Van Oorschot and
Scott Vanstone
Appendix E
Page 5 of 10
3CS2202 Ethical Hacking [2 – 2 4]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to understand the Ethics behind hacking.
• Students will be possible to exploit the vulnerabilities related to Computer System and Networks
• Students will be exposed to the methodology to be followed on hacking a system.
Syllabus
Introduction to Ethical Disclosure: Ethics of Ethical Hacking, Ethical Hacking and the legal system, Proper
and Ethical Disclosure
Penetration Testing and Tools: Using Metasploit, Using BackTrack LiveCD Linux Distribution
Exploits: Programming Survival Skills, Basic Linux Exploits, Advanced Linux Exploits, Shellcode Strategies,
Writing Linux Shellcode, Basic windows Exploits
Vulnerability Analysis: Passive Analysis, Advanced Static Analysis with IDA Pro, Advanced Reverse
Engineering, Client-side browser exploits, Exploiting Windows Access Control Model for Local Elevation
Privilege, Intelligent Fuzzing with Sulley, From Vulnerability to Exploit
Malware Analysis: Collecting Malware and Initial Analysis, Hacking Malare
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
References
1. Gray Hat Hacking: The Ethical Hackers' Handbook by Shon Harris, Allen Harper, Chris Eagle and
Jonathan Ness - TMH Edition
2. Hacking: The Art of Exploitation by Jon Erickson - SPD
3CS1105 Comprehensive Assessment – I [- - - 1]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to realize the collective understanding of various courses studied in the
semester.
Syllabus
Student will be assessed on the basis of all the courses learned till end of the respective semester.
3SP1104 ICT Tools [- 1 - -]
At the end of the course, students will be:
• Aware of some of the latest ICT tools available for general purpose, academic and research use.
• Able to use ICT tools for application development / Research / Academic / Personal development
in the related field of study.
Syllabus
At least 5 tools have to be explored by the students as per their need to be decided in consultation with the
respective Course Coordinator for the respective Program.
Semester II
3CS2201 Securing Interconnecting Systems [2 – 2 4]
Learning Outcome
Appendix E
Page 6 of 10
• Students will be able to understand the various ways in which the interconnecting systems would be
connected.
• Students will be able to realize the need of systems from security point of view.
• Students will be able to design a Secured Network by configuring various elements of networks and
devices.
Syllabus
Introduction to System Interconnection, Planning-Establishing-Maintaining-Disconnecting Interconnect
Systems, Enterprise Systems - Heterogeneous and Interdependent
Resilience of the Internet Interconnection Ecosystem- Resilience and Efficiency, Service Level Agreements,
Reachability, Traffic and Performance, Regulation
Network Security and building Security insurance policies, Security Triangle, Responding to security incident,
Methods of network attacks, Evaluating network security, Disaster recovery considerations
Constructing a comprehensive network security policy, Threat and vulnerability analysis, Implementation of
controls and safeguard, Traffic/Log analysis, Audit planning and techniques
Securing Routers –authentication, authorization, Accounting, Detailed router auditing
Securing Switches - protecting layer2 switches, VLAN hopping, Switch spoofing, STP attacks, DHCP server
spoofing, Port Security
Firewalls – ACL, Traffic Filtering and traffic inspection, Alerts and audit trails, Security zones, Zone firewall
policies
Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and Intrusion detection Systems (IDS)- Detection methods, Networkbased
Vs Host-based IPS, IDS and IPS appliances, Alarms
Securing Storage Area Networks- Overview of SAN, Fundamentals and benefits, SAN security fundamentals,
SAN Attacks, SAN Security Technologies
Securing VOIP-enabled Networks - Defining VOIP, VOIP benefits, VOIP Network, VOIP network
Components and VOIP protocols, Common voice vulnerabilities, Securing VOIP Network
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
References
1. CCSDS guide for secure system interconnection, NIST
2. Fundamentals of Network and Security by Eric Maiwald, TMH
3. CCNA Security Official Exam Certification Guide, Cisco Press
4. Various Research papers
3CS2203 Cyber Security and Laws [3 – 1 4]
Learning Outcome
• Students would be able to relate various methods used by the Forensic Department
• Students would be able to introduce a novel methodology of performing Cyber Forensics or System
Forensics
• Students will realize the Laws enforced by the Judiciary to handle cyber crimes and cyber frauds
• Students would realize how the digital evidences will be handled in any crime scene
Syllabus
Computer and Cyber Forensic Basics- Introduction to Computers, Computer History, Software, Hardware,
Appendix E
Page 7 of 10
Classification, Computer Input-Output Devices, Windows, DOS Prompt Commands, Basic Computer
Terminology, Internet, Networking, Computer Storage, Cell Phone / Mobile Forensics, Computer Ethics and
Application Programs, Cyber Forensic Basics- Introduction to Cyber Forensics, Storage Fundamentals, File
System Concepts, Data Recovery, Operating System Software and Basic Terminology
Data and Evidence Recovery- Introduction to Deleted File Recovery, Formatted Partition Recovery, Data
Recovery Tools, Data Recovery Procedures and Ethics, Preserve and safely handle original media, Document
a "Chain of Custody", Complete time line analysis of computer files based on file creation, file modification
and file access, Recover Internet Usage Data, Recover Swap Files/Temporary Files/Cache Files, Introduction
to Encase Forensic Edition, Forensic Tool Kit (FTK) etc, Use computer forensics software tools to cross
validate findings in computer evidence-related cases.
Cyber Crimes and Cyber Laws- Introduction to IT laws & Cyber Crimes – Internet, Hacking, Cracking,
Viruses, Virus Attacks, Pornography, Software Piracy, Intellectual property, Legal System of Information
Technology, Social Engineering, Mail Bombs, Bug Exploits, and Cyber Security etc…
Cyber Forensics Investigation- Introduction to Cyber Forensic Investigation, Investigation Tools,
eDiscovery, Digital Evidence Collection, Evidence Preservation, E-Mail Investigation, E-Mail Tracking, IP
Tracking, E-Mail Recovery, Encryption and Decryption methods, Search and Seizure of Computers,
Recovering deleted evidences, Password Cracking
Cyber Security- Introduction to Cyber Security, Implementing Hardware Based Security, Software Based
Firewalls, Security Standards, Assessing Threat Levels, Forming an Incident Response Team, Reporting
Cyber crime, Operating System Attacks, Application Attacks, Reverse Engineering & Cracking Techniques
and Financial Frauds
Security Audit and Standards: Risk Assessment and Management, Asset Classification, Crisis Management
Plan, Resources Recovery Strategy, Security Testing, International Standards, Analysis and Logging, Security
Certification
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
References
1. Cyber Security, Cyber Crime and Cyber Forensics: Applications and Perspectives by Raghu
Santanam, Sethumadhavan, Mohit Virendra, IGI Global
2. IT Auditing Using controls to protect Information Assets by Chris Davis, TMH
3CS2204 Intrusion Detection Systems [3 – 1 4]
Learning Outcomes
• Students would be able to realize the research aspects in the field of Intrusion Detection Systems
• Students will be exposed to various aspects of IDS and IPS
• Students would be motivated to instigate various research projects in the area of IDS
Syllabus
Approaches in Anomaly based Intrusion Detection Systems: Introduction, Payload based vs. header based
approaches, setting up an ABS, PAYL & POSEIDON, Conclusions
Formal Specification for Fast Automatic Profiling of Program Behavior: Introduction, Related Works,
Methodology, Case Study, Remus configuration and conclusions
Learning Behavior Profiles from Noisy Sequences: Introduction, Learning by abstraction, Regular
Expressions, String Alignment and Flexible Matching, Learning Algorithm, Evaluation of Artificial Traces,
User Profiling
Appendix E
Page 8 of 10
Correlation Analysis of Intrusion Alerts: Introduction, Approaches based on similarity between Alert
Attributes, approaches based on predefined attack scenarios, approaches based on prerequisites and
consequences of attacks, approaches based on multiple information sources, Privacy issues in auto correlation
An approach to preventing, correlating, predicting multi-step network attacks: Introduction, Related work,
preliminaries, Hardening network to prevent multistep intrusions, Correlating and predicting multiple steps
attacks
Response: Bridging the link between Intrusion Detection alerts and security policies: Security Policy
Formalism, Threat Response system, From alerts to new policies
Intrusion Detection and Reaction: An integrated approach to network security: Proposed Framework,
Architecture for Intrusion Detection, Intrusion reactions, attack sessions, intrusion detection subsystem,
traffic classification and intrusion reaction, testing
Self Learning Component
To be decided by course coordinator at the beginning of semester, which will be a blend of one or more of
the e-Learning Resources, Video Lectures, Online courses, tools, research material, web links etc. along with
the related assessment component(s).
Laboratory Work
Above concepts are to be implemented and at least 5 experiments are to be carried out.
References
1. Intrusion Detection Systems by Roberto Di Pietro and Luigi Mancini, Springer
2. Intrusion Detection Systems with Snort, Rafeeq Ur Rehman, Pearson Education, Prentice Hall
3. Guide to Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems, National Institute of Science and Technology
3SP1204 Research Methodology [- 1 - -]
Learning Outcome
• Students would be able to ascertain basic objectives and motivation of research for societal
development
• Students would be able to critically evaluate current research and propose possible alternate
directions for further work
• Students would be aware of various data collection and analysis using qualitative methods and
modern data processing tools
• Students would be able to develop hypothesis and methodology for research
• Students would be able to comprehend and deal with complex research issues in order to
communicate their scientific results clearly for peer review
• Students would be able to document research work accomplished
Syllabus
Objective of research, motivation in research, types of research, interdisciplinary research, scientific methods
of research, criteria of good research, and characteristics of a good researcher.
Defining Research Problem: Art of literature review, user of ICT in effective literature review, formulation of
problem, formulation of hypothesis, developing research plan, meaning of research design, types of research
design, basic principles of experimental design, selection of relevant variables, validity of experiments.
Data Collection and Utilization: Types of data, methods & techniques of data collection, sampling,
characteristic of a good sample design, methods used in sampling, sampling errors, tests of hypothesis.
Quantitative Methods: Data presentation, statistical analysis and interpretation of data, types of analysis,
simple regression analysis, correlation, coefficient of determination (r2), z-test, t-test, ANOVA, Chi-square
test, multi-variate analysis of data, multiple regression.
Computer Application: Role of computer in research, data organization, software selection and its
applications, solving problems by using scientific software & tools, sample programs for analysis of data.
Thesis Writing and Presentation: Significance of writing thesis, different types of research writing; conference
Appendix E
Page 9 of 10
paper, journal paper, patents, thesis etc., different steps in writing thesis, layout of thesis, guidelines for
writing good thesis, precautions in writing thesis, presentations skills, defending the thesis.
References
1. Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques by C R Kothari, 2e, Wishwa Publication, New Delhi
2. Research Methodology by D K Bhattacharyya, 1 e, Excel Books, New Delhi, 2003
3. How to Research by Loraine Blaxter, Christina Hughes and Molcolm Tight, Viva Books Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi
4. Writing Your Thesis by Paul Oliver, Vistaar Pulication, New Delhi, 2006
5. The Research Student’s Guide to Success by Pat Cryer, Viva Books Pvt Ltd., New Delhi
3CS1201 Research Seminar [- - 1 1]
Candidates have to select any Research Topic as Self Study for their Research Seminar. They will be required
to present the progress of their Study in front of the Reviewing Panel at Regular intervals. During the final
review, students are required to submit the report of Seminar.
3CS1205 Comprehensive Assessment – II [- - - 1]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to realize the collective understanding of various courses studied in the
semester.
Syllabus
Student will be assessed on the basis of all the courses learned till end of the respective semester.
Semester – III
3CS1301 Project Part – 1 [- - 30 13]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to think creatively and independently.
• Students will be able to explore other facets of Research through new thinking and ideas.
• Students will be able to analyze systems and find problems.
• Students will be able to communicate effectively.
• Students will have an aptitude for optimization and enhancements in their area of specialization.
• Students will realize the need and importance of Research and the ethics involved in Research.
• Students will be better professionals.
Syllabus
The students will carry out a project with significant technical contribution either in the institute, any R&D
organization or Industry. At the end of the semester III, students will submit a report on the progress of his
work.
3SP1301 Practical Training [- - - -]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be oriented to decide upon the tools to be used in dissertation depending on their areas
of interest.
• Students will be ready for dissertation work.
Syllabus
During practical training of 4-6 weeks, students will learn required software tools/ methodologies, either in
industry/research organizations/academic institutions etc. or there will be a planned in-house training by our
faculty members/experts from other organizations, which will help them in their PG dissertation work.
Appendix E
Page 10 of 10
Semester – IV
3CS1401 Project Part – II [- - 30 14]
Learning Outcome
• Students will be able to think creatively and independently.
• Students will be able to explore other facets of Research through new thinking and ideas.
• Students will be able to analyze systems and find problems.
• Students will be able to communicate effectively.
• Students will have an aptitude for optimization and enhancements in their area of specialization.
• Students will realize the need and importance of Research and the ethics involved in Research.
• Students will be better professionals.
Syllabus
The student will continue the project work started in semester III and complete the work defined and submit
final dissertation for evaluation.

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